Location
All office are located at Level 8, Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre (CMC), except where otherwise noted.

* Located at the Department of English Annex, Academic 1 (AC1)

** Located at Mong Man-wai Building (MMW)
Inquiries
Tel: +852 3442 8870
Email: english@cityu.edu.hk

PhD students


Email address

Simon Berry

Title of thesis
Transhumanist Representations in Speculative Fiction (Provisional)

Short abstract of thesis
An examination of transhumanist representations in contemporary speculative fiction in the context of relevant cultural, scientific, societal and political discourse which forces a re-evaluation of the humanity's ethical values and question our notion of what it means to be human. Primary works include Seveneves, Ex Machina, Mindscan, Cloud Atlas and Neuromancer.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Jeffrey Mather

 


Email address

Thomas Chan

Title of thesis
Interactional metadiscourse and citation use in rhetorical moves: A cross-paradigm comparative study of literature reviews in published research articles (Provisional)

Short abstract of thesis
Using a cross-paradigm approach, Thomas' current study aims to examine how interactional metadiscourse and citations are used in different sections (i.e., rhetorical moves) of literature reviews in published research articles following three epistemological paradigms. It is expected that the study can offer insights into how paradigms influence the two linguistic features in research writing.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Becky Kwan

 

Email address

Echo Fu

Title of thesis
Fin-de-siècle ghost literature: subjectivity in transition in China and Britain.

Short abstract of thesis
Echo explores the fin-de-siècle ghost stories by Chinese writers Wang Tao, Xuan Ding and British writers Vernon Lee and E. Nesbit, especially their evocation of the ghost as a way to critique or reformulate state and personal history and to negotiate with new modes of masculinity and femininity.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Klaudia Lee

 

Email address

Aleksandar Kordis

Title of thesis
Enhancing Mapping Procedures in Cognitive Narratology through a Multiplicity Framework

Short abstract of thesis
Aleksandar's research seeks to expand on mapping procedures in cognitive narratology by integrating a multiplicity framework. Cognitive narratology seeks to come to an understanding of the author's mind through an analysis of cognitive parameters within the text. The integration of a multiplicity framework allows for insight into deeper features of cognitive dynamics present within a narrative.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Klaudia Lee

 

Email address

Annise Lam

Title of thesis
The women who transcend space-time boundaries: a cross-cultural feminist narratological approach to the narrative structure and the aesthetics of framings in Enchi Fumiko's and Jane Austen's fictions

Short abstract of thesis
Annise's dissertation deconstructs the narrative structure and the framing strategies of the novels by Jane Austen and Enchi Fumiko adopting Susan Lanser's feminist narratology approach. The framing techniques structurally inform the historical and cultural circumstances and address the voices of the women entrapped within traditional conventions of feminine behaviour in the patriarchal cultures. The study is concluded with the cross-cultural observation in the use of narratological strategies.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Klaudia Lee

 

Email address

Tina Lin

Title of thesis
Accident Disclosures in Corporate Social Responsibility Reports of Chinese State-owned Enterprises: A Discourse Analysis

Short abstract of thesis
Tina is currently researching voluntary disclosures of occupational safety in corporate social responsibility reports of state-owned enterprises in Mainland China. Her thesis addresses the representation of occupational incidents in a sample of 97 corporate social responsibility reports published over the period 2005-2014 by 33 Chinese SOEs.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Stephen Bremner

 

Email address

Katrina Marshall

Title of thesis
Five Get Into Gender Trouble: A comparative exploration of gender performances and identities, as portrayed in the Famous Five original series through to Hodder's revised 2010 editions.

Short abstract of thesis
Katrina's research is concerned with the portrayal of sex and gender in children's literature. The focus is predominantly on Hodder Children's Books "sensitively revised" editions of Enid Blyton's Famous Five series. Her thesis connects issues including gender stereotyping, critical labels of gender performance, sexism, and the power structures manifested within such constructs.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Peter Jordan

 

Email address

Maritza Ortega

Title of thesis
Learner Corpus Creation and Interlanguage Analysis in a Chilean EFL Teacher Training Program

Short abstract of thesis
Maritza's study aims to compile the spoken interlanguage of pre-service EFL teachers in order to carry out a Computer-aided Error Analysis (CEA). This new approach to the analysis of learner errors will allow the researcher to gain new insights on the grammatical and lexical features of English that Chilean pre-service EFL teachers have problems with.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Brian King

 

Email address

Tony Qin

Title of thesis
Reading Penelope Fitzgerald's "Historical" Novels: Time, Historicality, and Recognition

Short abstract of thesis
For the proposed thesis, Tony argues that temporal distanciation is the productive ground of Penelope Fitzgerald's novels. He reads the main topoi in Fitzgerald's "historical" novels, namely, time, narrated time, historical novel, and recognition of identities. His reading is informed by Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutic phenomenology, in its reorientation of the referential function of the world of a literary work to the world of the reader. Through the act of reading, the reader refigures the dialectic of fictional time and historical time in Fitzgerald's fiction. Ricoeur calls it "narrated time," with its corollaries in narrative identity and recognition.

Name of Supervisor
Professor Roberto Simanowski

 


Email address

Benedict Rowlett

Title of thesis
Sponsorship: an exploration of sexuality, agency, socialisation, and competence in local English language practices in Cambodia

Short abstract of thesis
Benedict's thesis explores the discursive territory of a local social practice taking place in English within the ethnosexual contact zone of a tourist city in Cambodia. Using a narrative knowledging approach together with a poststructuralist discourse analysis from an ethnographic perspective, the thesis seeks to provide a particular account of how local language practices are constituted by the actions needed to get ahead in a globalised, transnational world

Name of Supervisor
Dr Brian King

 


Email address

Cathay Wang

Title of thesis
Metapragmatics of the closet: Chinese lesbians' stealth practice

Short abstract of thesis
Cathay's dissertation project takes the poststructuralist perspective of gender and sexuality, and aims to argue that instead of being "either in or out", Chinese lesbians would often practice stealth. This practice can be seen as the negotiation of all kinds of desires and values, and is manifested in a metapragmatic way in these lesbians' discourse.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Brian King

 


Email address

Huabin Wang

Title of thesis
Discursive Construction of Image in Crisis: Malaysia as a Rebranding Nation

Short abstract of thesis
Huabin's proposed thesis endeavors to conduct an analysis of the government discourse about Malaysia Airline Crash MH370, which focuses on media representations of the Malaysian government, its political stances towards the accident and the discursive process of image reconstruction as a rebranding nation.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Carl Ng

 


Email address

Lorraine Yao

Title of thesis
English as a Lingra Franca in Mainland China: An Analysis of Intercultural Business Communicative Competence (IBCC)

Short abstract of thesis
The rapidly-globalized economy of China has indicated that intercultural business communication (IBC) between people from China and the rest of the world has been broadened and deepened. In general, however, few empirical studies have been conducted on BELF in Mainland China, so that little is actually known on this issue. Under such circumstances, in response, her study aims to explore the nature of BELF used in business environment of Mainland China by analyzing Chinese business professionals’ communicative competence for IBC.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Bertha Du-Babcock

 


Email address

Cindy Yu

Title of thesis
Language socialization in the workplace: the acquisition of a professional genre by novice construction engineers in Hong Kong.

Short abstract of thesis
Cindy's study is a qualitative multiple case study on the transition process of novice construction engineers in Hong Kong. The study adopts multiple data sources including semi-structured interviews, field observations, and genre analysis to address different perspectives of workplace language socialization process of the engineers.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Christoph A. Hafner